July302014
10PM

endless list of horror movies → the uninvited ( 2009 )

(via anneboleyns)

10PM

Many adults are put off when youngsters pose scientific questions. Children ask why the sun is yellow, or what a dream is, or how deep you can dig a hole, or when is the world’s birthday, or why we have toes.

Too many teachers and parents answer with irritation or ridicule, or quickly move on to something else. Why adults should pretend to omniscience before a five-year-old, I can’t for the life of me understand. What’s wrong with admitting that you don’t know? Children soon recognize that somehow this kind of question annoys many adults. A few more experiences like this, and another child has been lost to science.

There are many better responses. If we have an idea of the answer, we could try to explain. If we don’t, we could go to the encyclopedia or the library. Or we might say to the child: “I don’t know the answer. Maybe no one knows. Maybe when you grow up, you’ll be the first to find out.

Carl Sagan (via acoupletshort)

(Source: cosmo-nautic, via anneboleyns)

yes 

July212014
Introducing: The Goonies

(Source: savethegoondocks, via savethegoondocks)

9AM

gettingsweptaway:

waiting on album five info like

image

(via andthatlittleblackdress)

9AM

asriels:

*breaks into j k rowling’s house in the middle of the night* no it’s okay i’m not here to steal anything i just think we need to talk about harry naming one of his kids after snape

(via anneboleyns)

9AM

readmore-worryless:

"Too many books?" I believe the phrase you’re looking for is "not enough bookshelves".

(via anneboleyns)

July142014

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via maybeyouinspireme)

(Source: easyreadingisdamnhardwriting, via anneboleyns)

wow 

July122014

Out-of-stater on guys we met at a bar: These California guys are screwing with my head. 

July72014
“I will never
be able to
look at another person
in their eyes
when all I see
in other people
is you.”

A Story A Day #187 by M.D.L 

(via mingdliu)

(via andthatlittleblackdress)

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